Bamboo

In a Bamboo cocktail, the two kinds of bitters add a new dimension to the sherry, making it more aromatic. A fellow blogger, The Cultivated Mind, recently wrote an interesting post about The Return of Bitters, so if you are interested in learning more about this product, check it out.

It was invented in Japan in the 1890s and can be perceived as an old man’s drink. Bamboo can be translated to a barrel-aged cocktail with a few adjustments to the original recipe as well.

Unknown

Bamboo

1 1/2 ounces dry amontillado sherry

1 1/2 ounces dry vermouth

2 dashes orange bitters

1 dash Angostura bitters

Lemon twist

* Combine sherry, vermouth, bitters and cracked ice in a mixing glass.

* Stir ingredients for 20-30 seconds until well chilled.

* Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

* Add a twist of lemon to serve.

Barrel-Aged Bamboo

16 ounces sherry

16 ounces dry vermouth

1/2 ounce orange bitters

1 teaspoon Angostura bitters

1-liter oak barrel

(For Serving:  Ice and Lemon Twists)

* If the barrel is new and dry inside, fill it with water and let stand until watertight (about 24 hours) and drain.

* Fill the barrel with all of the liquid ingredients needed for your cocktail, using a funnel.

* Age the cocktail until it has taken on a softer, rounded but not overly oaky flavor (about 1 month).  Taste a sample once a week to ensure that you are not letting it age too long.

* Strain the cocktail through a coffee filter-lined funnel into a glass container.

* If you age a new cocktail in the barrel after a previous one, it may pick up on some of the flavor from the first cocktail aged in the barrel.  This can be a fun thing to play around with while aging drinks!

* Store until you are able to enjoy!

* To serve, pour 3 ounces into an ice-filled cocktail shaker and stir until chilled.  Strain the drink into a chilled cocktail glass and serve with a lemon twist.

Advertisements

El Presidente

El Presidente is a Cuban cocktail that originated in Havana in the 1920s.  It can be translated to a barrel-aged cocktail with a few adjustments to the original recipe as well.

Unknown

El Presidente

1.5 ounces light rum

0.75 ounce dry vermouth

2 dashes Curacao

1 dash grenadine

Shake well with cracked ice and strain into cocktail glass.

Aged El Presidente

18.5 ounces of gold rum

9 ounces of dry vermouth

3 ounces of Grand Marnier

2 ounces of grenadine

1-liter oak barrel

(For Serving:  Ice and Orange Twists)

* If the barrel is new and dry inside, fill it with water and let stand until watertight (about 24 hours) and drain.

* Fill the barrel with all of the liquid ingredients needed for your cocktail, using a funnel.

* Age the cocktail until it has taken on a softer, rounded but not overly oaky flavor (about 1 month).  Taste a sample once a week to ensure that you are not letting it age too long.

* Strain the cocktail through a coffee filter-lined funnel into a glass container.

* If you age a new cocktail in the barrel after a previous one, it may pick up on some of the flavor from the first cocktail aged in the barrel.  This can be a fun thing to play around with while aging drinks!

* Store until you are able to enjoy!

* To serve, pour 3 ounces into an ice-filled cocktail shaker and stir until chilled.  Strain the drink into a chilled cocktail glass and serve with an orange twist.

Negroni

The Negroni is a perfect before dinner drink, comprised of gin, Campari and sweet vermouth. Campari is a popular bitter aperitif in Italy produced by the infusion of herbs and fruit. This classic Italian cocktail was first made for the Count Negroni in 1919.  There have been many variations of this drink since then.  The Negroni can be translated to a barrel-aged cocktail with a few adjustments to the original recipe as well.

Last week was Negroni week, where different restaurants and bars around the world donated a percentage of the profits made from this drink to charity.  Many of the establishments also made twists on this classic drink for the week.

images

Negroni

1 ounce Campari

1 ounce sweet vermouth

1 ounce gin

* Shake well with cracked ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

Variation: For a tall drink pour over ice cubes in highball glass and fill with soda water.

Barrel-Aged Negroni

11 ounces gin

11 ounces sweet vermouth

11 ounces Campari

1-liter oak barrel

(For Serving:  Ice and Orange Twists)

* If the barrel is new and dry inside, fill it with water and let stand until watertight (about 24 hours) and drain.

* Fill the barrel with all of the liquid ingredients needed for your cocktail, using a funnel.

* Age the cocktail until it has taken on a softer, rounded but not overly oaky flavor (about 1 month).  Taste a sample once a week to ensure that you are not letting it age too long.

* Strain the cocktail through a coffee filter-lined funnel into a glass container.

* If you age a new cocktail in the barrel after a previous one, it may pick up on some of the flavor from the first cocktail aged in the barrel.  This can be a fun thing to play around with while aging drinks!

* Store until you are able to enjoy!

* To serve, pour 3 ounces into an ice-filled rocks glass and stir well. Serve with an orange twist.

Gin Martini

The catchphrase that springs to mind for me when discussing martinis is the quintessential James Bond quote referencing how he prefers his martinis, “shaken, not stirred.”  Now I have never actually seen a James Bond movie (I know, I know… I’ve been chastised many times!), so maybe his martinis are vodka based and I am way off base by even including this anecdote for the gin martini recipe.  The Gin Martini can be translated to a barrel-aged cocktail with a few adjustments to the original recipe as well.

I always find it interesting, though, that the method people in the industry will describe as the actual preferred method for martinis is stirred because shaking changes the elements of the ingredients too much.  They will say that simplicity is key in this drink.

Are you a Martini drinker? I can neither confirm nor deny the concept because Martinis are not a drink I imbibe in often, unless I am trying the girly, chocolate or flavored Martinis.

images

Gin Martini

2 ounces dry gin

1 ounce dry vermouth

Ice

Olive or Lemon Twist

* Combine the gin and vermouth in a shaker filled halfway with ice, and stir vigorously until well chilled (about 20 seconds).

* Strained into a chilled glass.

* Garnish with olive or lemon twist.  (If using the lemon twist, be sure to run the slice over the rim of the glass.)

Barrel-Aged Gin Martini

22 ounces gin

11 ounces dry vermouth

1-liter oak barrel

(For Serving:  Ice and Lemon Twists)

* If the barrel is new and dry inside, fill it with water and let stand until watertight (about 24 hours) and drain.

* Fill the barrel with all of the liquid ingredients needed for your cocktail, using a funnel.

* Age the cocktail until it has taken on a softer, rounded but not overly oaky flavor (about 1 month).  Taste a sample once a week to ensure that you are not letting it age too long.

* Strain the cocktail through a coffee filter-lined funnel into a glass container.

* If you age a new cocktail in the barrel after a previous one, it may pick up on some of the flavor from the first cocktail aged in the barrel.  This can be a fun thing to play around with while aging drinks!

* Store until you are able to enjoy!

* To serve, pour 3 ounces into an ice-filled cocktail shaker and stir until chilled.  Strain the drink into a chilled cocktail and serve with an lemon twist.

Manhattan

The Manhattan is a classic and popular drink concocted with whiskey and sweet vermouth.  Most people prefer it stirred, but some like it shaken.  This drink reminds me of my grandma as it was her cocktail of choice at more fancy events. She liked hers on the rocks and mixed strong. She only drank one by the time I was old enough to remember her with this drink, but I imagine in her prime she would enjoy a few more on an evening out with my grandpa!  The Manhattan can be translated to a barrel-aged cocktail with a few adjustments to the original recipe as well.

images

Manhattan

1 1/2 ounces rye or blended whiskey

3/4 ounce sweet vermouth

1 dash aromatic bitters

Stir well with cracked ice and strain into cocktail glass.  Decorate with cocktail cherry or twist of lemon.

Aged White Manhattan

16 ounces unaged white whiskey

16 ounces white vermouth

1/2 ounce orange bitters

1-liter oak barrel

(For Serving:  Ice and Lemon Twists)

* If the barrel is new and dry inside, fill it with water and let stand until watertight (about 24 hours) and drain.

* Fill the barrel with all of the liquid ingredients needed for your cocktail, using a funnel.

* Age the cocktail until it has taken on a softer, rounded but not overly oaky flavor (about 1 month).  Taste a sample once a week to ensure that you are not letting it age too long.

* Strain the cocktail through a coffee filter-lined funnel into a glass container.

* If you age a new cocktail in the barrel after a previous one, it may pick up on some of the flavor from the first cocktail aged in the barrel.  This can be a fun thing to play around with while aging drinks!

* Store until you are able to enjoy!

* To serve, pour 3 ounces into an ice-filled cocktail shaker and stir until chilled.  Strain the drink into a chilled cocktail glass and serve with a lemon twist.

Barrel-Aged Cocktails

My dad has a few wine barrels in his basement that he used to use to make homemade wine.  I have been debating whether or not to attempt making my own wine in these barrels, but after hearing about barrel-aged cocktails I may have stumbled upon another project to try first!

Barrel-aging cocktails infuses vanilla, caramel and oak flavors subtly into the drink.  I think it would be very interesting to taste first-hand on a smaller scale how wood and air can change the cocktail by trying samples of the drink each week.  People who have barrel-aged cocktails explain the process as softening the harsh edges, blending the flavors more harmoniously and adding layers of flavor.

Some cocktails that are known to work well being barrel-aged include Manhattans, Gin Martinis, Negronis, Chrysanthemums, El Presidentes and Bamboos.   I am still debating what type of drink I want to try the first round.  I am also thinking that a smaller, one liter barrel might work much better than a large wine barrel.  Are there any other cocktails that you think might work well with this process?

images

Barrel-Aging Cocktails

* If the barrel is new and dry inside, fill it with water and let stand until watertight (about 24 hours) and drain.

* Fill the barrel with all of the liquid ingredients needed for your cocktail, using a funnel.

* Age the cocktail until it has taken on a softer, rounded but not overly oaky flavor (about 1 month).  Taste a sample once a week to ensure that you are not letting it age too long.

* Strain the cocktail through a coffee filter-lined funnel into a glass container.

* If you age a new cocktail in the barrel after a previous one, it may pick up on some of the flavor from the first cocktail aged in the barrel.  This can be a fun thing to play around with while aging drinks!

* Store until you are able to enjoy!